Emily P.

I began my years at imago in the pre-first program, and over the years I moved with the school from Shattuck Street in Littleton to St. Bridgets’s in Maynard. I graduated from 8th grade at Imago, and went on to join in the pilot program for the Imago Upper School. I, along with a few other classmates, welcomed this new chapter in our lives. Imago exceeded our expectations; instilling in us a renewed desire to learn, and offering us challenges for which I will always be grateful. I left Imago to attend Trivium, where I graduated in 2003. I went on to study biology as a pre-med major at Concordia University in Ann Arbor, MI where I met my husband, Jake while we were playing collegiate soccer. I transferred to Norwich University in VT to attend nursing school, where I graduated in 2007 with a BSN. After graduation I travelled back to Massachusetts with my husband, where he served as an officer recruiter for the Marine Corps in Amherst. We are currently stationed at The Marine Corps Recruiting Station in Lexington, KY, where we have been for the past two and a half years. We have travelled a great deal over the past few years, and this spring we will be making our 8thmove together as we head back to Quantico, VA with the Marine Corps. We have been through several lengthy deployments, which have brought their own set of challenges and rewards; the latest was particularly unique as I welcomed our third son while Jake was in Afghanistan. We have four children, three sons and a daughter, who are remarkably resilient, hilarious, earnest individuals. As a military family we have had the opportunity to travel, to make incredible friends from all over the world, and to be a part of various units and a military family that is unmatched in its closeness.  We look forward to what the next move and the next duty station can offer for us and our family, and in return what we can do to serve our community wherever that may be.

 

Throughout my years at Imago I was blessed to be a part of a community that espoused not only great knowledge and education for the mind, but for the soul as well. The care that each and every teacher took to show us in very deliberate ways that our spiritual lives were intertwined with our education was invaluable. I am grateful for each painstakingly well thought out lesson that helped to form my thinking as well as my faith. I learned what it means to serve and to lead with quiet humility from the same teachers who introduced me to phonics, Shakespeare and the Periodic Table. There were many service and leadership opportunities including mentoring younger students, cleaning blackboards, and at one point, coaching soccer. These opportunities allowed me to invest energy and creativity into my inherent skillset and furnished me with a deep desire to use these skills throughout my life and within my various vocations; as mother, wife, nurse, and military spouse. Imago inspired me towards a life of service and leadership.  The Imago community inspired me to have a backbone, to be courageous, and to “get comfortable with being uncomfortable.” We were given the opportunity to stretch ourselves and to go beyond ourselves to serve, cherish and honor others and their lives. Out of my many Imago memories, I am especially grateful for the chapel speakers.  I remember hearing from those individuals who made it their life’s work to go where it was hard, to do what was hard, to speak, and teach and pray and love that which was hard. I will always remember those speakers; the missionaries, the pastors, the professionals, and the parents who valued us as children so much that they would take time out of their lives and schedules to honor us with their presence; stating with their presence that our existence and our education were paramount. We were, and continue to be blessed to be surrounded by those individuals within the Imago community who, with every fiber of their being, instill worth in others by speaking their existence in light of The Creator.

As a Marine wife and a mother of four, I look back on my foundational time at Imago not only to reminisce about Reformation plays,  jog-a-thons, Myan temples dripping with painted blood, or insect collections (which still grace the walls of the Henrickson house), but also to serve as a reminder of my roots. No matter where I go or what I am called upon to do, I always have the voices of the Imago community in my head and in my heart.